August Favourites

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Welcome to another monthly favourites post, looking at all the things I’ve been loving in August! This month seems to have flown by and it’s mad to think that we are nearly in September. Bring on the cosy evenings in front of the fire, fluffy jumpers and Ugg boots. People who know me will know that I’m not a huge fan of summer and much prefer freezing cold winter days…I can’t wait.

Due to being pretty unwell over the past four or five weeks, this post is probably going to be a bit shorter than my usual monthly favourites posts, simply because in between a lot of sleeping and a lot of time being spent in hospital, I haven’t really done a lot to warrant favourites. But anyway, here we go…

Books

Last month, I talked about Holly Bourne’s first adult fiction book, How Do You Like Me Now? which has recently released and that I had fairly low expectations, as her last young adult fiction book which had been released prior to that, wasn’t that great and felt rushed. After reading her latest release, back under the YA fiction umbrella, I can confirm that Holly Bourne is back. Are We All Lemmings and Snowflakes is possibly Holly’s best book, with a strong and unique plot line. As per her other books, Holly has focused on mental health, normalising it and reducing the stigma. The book follows Olive, a teenage girl living on the edge of a mental health crisis, who is given the opportunity to attend a summer camp for teens struggling with mental illnesses. Through her own experiences, Olive begins to put together a plan to not only solve her own mental illness, but the mental illnesses of everyone in the world. It is raw, compassionate and explores mental health in a sensitive but informative way.

Another book that I have enjoyed this month is Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow by Siobhan Curham. This is another book which has been beautifully written, looking at issues surrounding young carers and children and young people with refugee status in the UK. Stevie lives with her mum, on the poverty line, after her mum’s benefits are stopped. Hafiz is a Syrian refugee. Both are big dreamers and as their friendship develops, they begin to understand their similarities as well as their differences. Having experienced the benefits system, parts of this book really resonated with me: Siobhan highlights how powerless you end up feeling, when you are treated as nothing more than a statistical figure as opposed to a person.

Films/TV

Over the past few months, I have been watching Ackley Bridge and have ended up getting kind of hooked to it. When Waterloo Road was being shown on television, I was obsessed with it and now have the box set on DVD, which keeps me sane when insomnia strikes. Ackley Bridge is similar to Waterloo Road, in that it focuses on the lives of various students and members of staff at Ackley Bridge College. It’s probably not going to win any awards but it’s worth watching if you need something that doesn’t require much concentration. Series one and two are available to watch online now.

This month I did something very rare for me and went to the cinema to see Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again. My mum and I both love Mamma Mia, it is our go to film on rainy days, so it was only right that we went to the cinema to see the second film. I was a bit skeptical about it and wasn’t sure if it would live up to the hype and expectations but I loved it. It really is a proper feel good film (ignoring the gut wrenching scenes towards the end) and Lily James is beautiful.

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I am so excited that the line up to Strictly Come Dancing has been announced. Reminder to all my friends: don’t expect me to socialise on Saturday evenings once it starts!

The Great British Bake Off is also back soon. After just about getting over the move from the BBC to channel four, I am able to admit that actually, the new line up works well. I’m still loyal to Mary Berry but as the presenters and judges have gelled, it doesn’t feel as cringe to watch and for the most part, they are funny.

Spoonie Favourites

Let’s talk about pyjamas. I spent a lot of time in my pyjamas and if I got my own way, I would spent a lot more time in pyjamas. Because of this, I take pyjama buying very seriously. The majority of my pyjamas used to be M&S but recently, I’ve been disappointed in the quality of them, especially as they shrink in the wash and end up as angle swingers. That’s saying something considering how short my legs are. Having tried various other brands including Matalan, Tesco and Fat Face, I ended up buying a couple of pairs from Sainsbury’s and I can’t fault them. They are super soft, cosy and don’t shrink in the wash. They’re also fairly cheap, so any excuse to buy more!

Odds and Sods 

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Having gastroparesis means that food is something that I have come to dread, rather than enjoy, so finding foods that I’m able to eat without being sick and actually taste nice is fairly unheard of. I came across the brand Pudology, who make gluten and dairy free desserts, which is perfect for the diet that I have to follow. They taste so good and so far, I seem to have been able to eat them without any vomiting, which is great news!

What have your favourites been this month? I love finding out what other people have been loving and would recommend.

We’re All Winners and Losers

Being diagnosed with a health condition, be that short term or long term, can make you re-evaluate your life and what you value as important. If you had asked twenty year old me, before diagnosis, I would have told you that my priorities focused around education, work and being self reliant. At that age, I was just starting my PGCE degree in primary education and I was very much striving to be an outstanding teacher. And I was, but as I became more unwell, being an outstanding teacher was coming at the cost of me constantly fighting infections, being really unhappy and stressed, not having a life outside of university and placements. But ultimately I was left feeling like my best would never be good enough, because my best was slipping because of my health.

After six gruelling months of teaching training, I made the decision to leave my PGCE degree, to focus on my health. At the time, it was a tough decision to make and it came down to how unhappy I was, more than considering my health, but as the months after university progressed, it became more and more apparent that my health wasn’t stable enough to cope with the demands that teaching expects of you. I still miss the idea of teaching, since I can remember, I had wanted to be a teacher so I felt very lost in a world where I was directionless.

Fast-forward a few years and whilst I might miss the idea of teaching, I am so glad that I stopped training before I was forced to stop. Since then, I have left another job because of the demands on my health, much of it due to working shifts and not being able to form a decent routine or get enough sleep. I thought that having official diagnoses would mean that managerial staff would be more understanding over my physical limitations, as well as the other odd things that my body can do as a result of EDS and its friends. I was perhaps naive in that thought: having a piece of paper stating that I have EDS doesn’t automatically ensure that people understand life with a chronic illness, more so when it is invisible.

Earlier in the year, I talked about being offered a job in children’s social services, in the early intervention team. It was my dream job and something that I had been working towards since leaving university. I had to kiss goodbye to that job because of how unwell I’ve been and I’m not going to kid myself into thinking that one day I will be able to go into that line of work. I really do hope that one day I can return to work but realistically, it won’t be in early intervention work because my body won’t cope with the demands, hours and stresses from the job. It’s not just my own health or life that I have consider, I need to think about potential families I would be working with. They need continuity and that’t not something that I can offer.

Similar applies to my inner dream of working in the police force. For all the reasons that I’ve stated about, it’s not a practical line of work and let’s be honest, I wouldn’t even get close to passing the medical tests.

I now spend my days writing, reading, sleeping and sometimes I go a bit wild and sit in the garden. I have to plan my life around when I have medical appointments to try and ensure that I’m as well as possible to attend them, but chronic illness is unpredictable so even the best laid plans go wrong when it comes to attending appointments. I speak to friends every day. But I still feeling lonely, even though I’m not alone.

I’m probably making life with chronic illnesses a bit shit and yes, at times, it is. But there are positives, even if they aren’t glaringly obvious.

I’ve met some really wonderful people who also have chronic illnesses. We are an odd bunch; we don’t do the conventional things like go to the pub or go shopping all day. You’ll probably find us in pyjamas, watching rubbish TV or having a group nap. But that kind of support is invaluable, as is the understanding. We are unshakeable, nothing is too gross to talk about and we can symptom share without sounding like we are losing the plot. Our medical knowledge is extensive: why ring 111 when you can consult a spoonie friend?

I’ve also developed a new gratitude for the days when I’m well enough to do something. Planning things takes a lot more effort and energy. Days when I can spontaneously leave the house and few and far between but when I am able to, it feels amazing and it leaves me feeling like a normal twenty something woman again.

Younger me imagined that I would be a teacher and whilst that hasn’t happened, I do feel happy being able to dedicate more time to writing and raising awareness about chronic illnesses. I’ve been given opportunities to write articles for charities or other blogging platforms and was recently nominated for two WEGO Health Awards, for best in show: blogging and rookie of the year. You can find out more and vote for me here.

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I’m getting opportunities which I would not be able to follow up on, if I was working, which is exciting and nerve-wracking at the same time.

That doesn’t take away the uncertainty or the fact that some days are just shit, but I find it is so important to try and focus on the things which are positive and make life easier to contend with. Health anxiety isn’t ever going to go away, scanxiety isn’t ever going to not be there and as much as I wish for it, I’m not never going to be 100% healthy and stable. I can’t go on week long benders but I’m a pro at watching a whole box set in a day. It’s the little things that make up life.

Universal Credit Saga – Part Six

I’m going to try and keep this short and sweet. Having been away for the past week, I got home yesterday to be greeted by numerous brown envelope letters. I’m not a great fan of these types of letters, they fill me with dread and give me all the anxiety so I decided to ignore them and open them when I’m less exhausted. So, this morning was the morning that I did some adult admin, including opening the dreaded letters because even looking at them was making me feel a bit ill.

One of the letters was from universal credit and gave the decision of my work capability assessment. I’m not joking when I say that I’m writing this with teary eyes: I have been granted universal credit. I have been deemed ill enough to not need to be job searching or attending interviews and I don’t need to attend work commitment meetings anymore. It honestly feels like a huge weight has been lifted and I have been fully validated over a situation which I should not need validation for.

Obviously this is not an Oscar acceptance speech but I wanted to say a massive thank you to everyone who has dealt with the crying, ranting, swearing, anxiety attacks and all the negativity associated with universal credit. The system is a bastard and has made the last few months of my life utter hell. But this fight isn’t over completely. Yes, I am truly thankful that I have won against the most broken system possible but that is not going to stop me speaking out at how unjust the system is and how it’s failing the many, not the few.

Discrimination against invisible illness has got to stop.

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The Problem With Love Island

I love Love Island. I love the drama, the stupid comments, the recouplings, the challenges full of innuendos. I love almost everything about it. But this has got me thinking. As someone who identifies as being a feminist, does watching Love Island make me any less of a feminist or a bad feminist?

As with all reality television programmes, there has been criticism and controversy over Love Island and we are only four weeks in. Perhaps the biggest or most talked about controversy this year has been the behaviour of Adam, which has sparked warnings from domestic abuse and women’s charities about abusive behaviour and the signs of emotional abuse. Women’s Aid wants viewers to recognise unhealthy behaviour in relationships and to “speak out” against “domestic abuse”.

For people who don’t follow Love Island as avidly as I do, I’ll briefly explain: Adam entered the villa after the main coupling up show at the beginning of the series. He was initially coupled up with Kendall, but dumped Kendall for Rosie, who he then dumped for Zara. Both Kendall and Rosie have now been dumped from the villa due to Adam ditching them at recoupling. Adam also had a brief dalliance with Megan. So, in the space of roughly two and a half weeks, Adam has made his way through four women. Rosie literally slayed Adam over his behaviour towards her, stating that he didn’t like being ignored or like how he was behaving towards her. Adam responded by telling Rosie that she was childish and that he didn’t need to reassure her. It’s hard to portray why his behaviour was wrong, in words, but he actively laughed in her face when she talked about her insecurities and has manipulated situations after betraying the trust of various women in the villa.

But is Adam’s behaviour really a sign of emotional abuse or is he just behaving like a lad? Some people have spoken out, saying exactly that: that he is a lad in a villa/reality show with loads of girls in bikinis and can do what he wants and who he wants. Other people have called Rosie out, saying that she is an embarrassment to women and needs to grow a backbone.

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The simple fact is though, that if you are in a relationship and your partner starts to question your memory of events, trivialising your thoughts or feelings, or turns things around to blame you, it can be part of pattern of gaslighting and emotional abuse.

The level of control that Adam has over women in the villa is concerning and if he was to behave this way outside of an artificially maintained environment, then my personal view is that he needs to take a look at himself and his attitude towards women. Whilst Love Island is, ultimately, a game show, messing with people’s feelings in such an extreme way is not okay and gives a worrying message to viewers. It isn’t okay to gaslight someone, it isn’t okay to manipulate someone’s thoughts or feelings and it isn’t okay to belittle someone’s thoughts of feelings.

But my criticism of Love Island doesn’t end at Adam’s behaviour towards women in the villa. Something that was apparent even before the series started, when the line up was released was the lack of body diversity amongst the contestants. The men are all ripped and full of muscular six packs, clearly having spent hours and hours down the gym. The exception to this has been Alex, who works as an A&E doctor, and therefore doesn’t have the time to spend hours in the gym every day. Don’t get me wrong, he is still muscular but not to the same extent as the other men in the villa and he didn’t enter already sporting a glowing tan. Maybe this is why his coupling up process has been slower compared to other men in the villa or maybe it’s because he can withstand a conversation about Brexit, without worrying that we will lose all the trees and he doesn’t need to ask what an ear lobe is.

The lack of body diversity is apparent in the women as well. They entered the villa bronzed and toned, with no love handles when wearing bikinis and no obvious body “flaws”. If we are going to talk about stereotypical perfection, those women come pretty close. As someone who has struggled with body dismophia for years and years, watching Love Island can make me feel pretty crap about myself. I’m not tall with long legs, I don’t feel comfortable strutting around in minimal clothing and my body has more scars and flaws than I really want to think about and acknowledge. The women are all so very slim and have very few curves between them. In fact, the words of quippy contestant Niall, the girls look “like Instagram”, with criticism lamenting the distinct lack of body fat between them.

It would have been an perfect moment to show that love isn’t just about looks and that being beautiful doesn’t mean a body packed with muscles, being toned and having no space. However, now on series three and the casting remains an encouragement of a one-dimensional view on beauty and body types. Some people are slim. Some people are tall. Some people who have naturally flawless skin, but that isn’t a accurate representation of society and is teaching a poor message to more easily influenced younger viewers, who are being taught that beauty means tall, slim, legs up to their ears and hair down to their waist.

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The average woman in the UK in 2017 was a size 16 with a 34 inch waist and 36DD breasts. Whist the girls in the Love Island villa might have the latter of magazine perfect breasts, why is there not more representation when it comes to the former? Why, when the average body size is a 16, are the five women picked to enter the villa at the start of the series, all four dress sizes smaller than this and not representative of the average woman in the UK?

Don’t get me wrong, the women in Love Island are beautiful, each in their own ways. That I don’t dispute, but so are the hundreds of thousands of other body types that aren’t being represented on the show.

 

 

If you want more information about the warning signs of emotional abuse, you can contact the National Domestic Violence Helpline or Women’s Aid. Man Kind is a service for men, experiencing domestic abuse.

June Favourites

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Photo from spoonievillage calendar

 

Welcome to another monthly favourites post, looking at all the things I’ve been loving in June! At the time of writing this, it is exactly six months until Christmas and I’m not sorry to admit that I am somewhat pining for cold weather, fluffy jumpers and evenings with the fire lit. Hot weather doesn’t agree too well with my body. Anyway, on with my favourites for this month…

Books

Last month, I talked about I Am Thunder: And I Won’t Keep Quiet by Muhammad Khan and how much I loved it. It made me realise, however, how little I know about Islamic culture and a lot of what I did know, was based on new reports, which can give a very one-sided viewpoint. So, with that in mind, I decided to educate myself a little bit and find out more about Islamic culture, through the medium of books. After searching on Amazon, I came across Randa Abdel-Fattah, a litigation lawyer and human rights activist, living in Sydney. Her first book, Does My Head Look Big in This, follows the story of Amal, a sixteen year old living in Melbourne, who also happens to be a Muslim, struggling to honour the Islamic faith in a society that doesn’t understand it, following her decision to start wearing this hijab. The book is insightful, laugh out loud funny and at times, a bit of a tear jerker, and I’m not known for crying at books.

The second book by Abdel-Fattah that I read this month is The Lines We Cross. The book has a similar set up to Does My Head Look Big in This: it is set in an Australian secondary school and looks at how society perceives different cultures and religions, with anti-immigration rallies fighting against the raise of immigration into Australia. The flip side of this books looks at the story of an Afghani asylum seeker, who came to Australia on a boat, following besiegement of her home country and faces a negative reception from native Australians. Again, I would really recommend this book, despite it being a YA book, its themes are applicable to adults and teenagers alike.

A Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard was another favourite this month. Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life – she’s been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He’s deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she’s assigned to look after him. Put simply, this book was beautiful and I loved the perspective from Rhys, looking at how deaf people feel and deal with the hearing world, as well as how Steffi manages her social anxiety and the assumptions made by people around her.

My final book favourite for this month is Because We Are Bad by Lily Bailey. Anyone who wants to know about OCD, and how to fight back, should read this book – it is an emotional, challenging read. Lily takes the reader deep into the heart of the illness but she is also a deft writer, and even the darkest moments are peppered with wit and wry observations. Having a diagnosis of OCD meant that, at times, this book was a little hard hitting but I appreciate Lily’s honesty and could really relate to aspects of the book.

Films/TV

 

Okay so I only have one favourite from film and TV this month which is…dun dun duuuunnnn…

LOVE ISLAND.

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I am obsessed with this series and the first thing that I do when I wake up in the morning is watch the previous night’s episode on catch up. My life simply would not be complete without the daily debriefs with friends. My standout moments so far are Hayley on Brexit (and trees) and Rosie’s sass towards Adam. I still haven’t got over Kendall being dumped from the villa and I don’t think I ever will.

Spoonie Favourites

 

The Body Shop has come up on top again this month, with their spoonie friendly makeup and cosmetic products. A lot of the time, I don’t have the energy to spend ages and ages doing my makeup of having a long beauty regime, but at the same time, I don’t want to get into a downward spiral of not making any effort. A complete life saver in hot weather has been their mandarin face mist, which hydrates skin and is makeup friendly. Great if you need a quick refresh without any effort.

Another life saver has been their aloe soothing moisture lotion, with SPF 15. If you’re anything like me, putting sun cream on your face will result in claggy and blocked pores and all the spots, so this is brilliant at protecting your skin without breaking out in twenty million spots. It’s designed for sensitive skin and is paraben and alcohol free.

Continuing on the theme of quick and easy makeup products, Soap and Glory Fake Awake has been a recent discovery and is brilliant at covering up my ever growing dark circles, with minimal effort and time.

 

What have your favourites been this month? I love finding out what other people have been loving and would recommend.

 

May Favourites

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Welcome to another monthly favourites post, looking at all the things I’ve been loving in May! I can’t believe how quickly this year is going, I feel a bit rubbish that so far, I’m yet to really achieve anything in 2018, but the additional free time that I have had, has allowed me to discover new things, which I guess is a good thing. As you will have seen by the blog posts that I have been posting this month, May is Ehlers-Danlos Awareness Month, so some of my favourites from this month will be continuing with that theme.

Books

Like last month, I’ve mainly stuck to young adult (YA) fiction this month because I’ve been massively struggling with brain fog, which has affected my ability to concentrate and take in anything where I am required to think.

Last month, I received my first “payment” for writing, in the form of an Amazon voucher. In the grand scheme of things, this isn’t massively exciting but I’m pretty proud of myself. After some consideration, I decided to buy myself some books, because you can never have too many books. So, thanks to my Amazon voucher, I discovered Non Pratt, a fab YA author and I have made my way through Second Best Friend, Trouble and Unboxed. Second Best Friend and Unboxed were a pretty easy reads, for me, having only just over 100 pages, so I started and finished them both within the space of one afternoon. Neither of the books were especially stand out, although they were witty in places, but my reason for mentioning them is down to the fact that they are perfect for readers with dyslexia, with yellowed pages and a unique font. Not enough books are published with dyslexia suffers in mind but these books are accessible and age appropriate: struggling with reading does not mean that you should be stuck reading children’s books.

If you’ve read any of my previous monthly favourites blog posts, you’ll know that I am a huge fan of Cat Clarke, so it was a happy coincidence that I stumbled across Non Pratt, as a recommended author for people who love Cat Clarke’s books.

Speaking of Cat Clarke, her latest book We Are Young came out this month resulting in me sending a very excited message to Life of Pippa to inform her. I read the book in one day and I loved it. It’s a close call between We Are Young and Girlhood over my favourite Cat Clarke book. We Are Young was emotional, raw, powerful…I could continue, and I can’t wait until Cat’s next book is out. No pressure Cat!

One of my stand-out books of the year (bold statement, I know) has to be I Am Thunder: And I Won’t Keep Quiet by Muhammad Khan. Put simply: this book was amazing, literally the only fault that I could find with it is that it finished too soon. Despite this book again coming under the YA category of fiction, I honestly feel that everyone needs to read it. Muhammad Khan is a teacher in a British secondary school. He is also Muslim and writes about growing up as a British Muslim in the 21st century, having been inspired by media reports of the three Muslim girls who fled east London to join the so-called Islamic State. I don’t want to go into too much detail over the plot, however I will say that I learnt a great deal from the book and there needs to be more books ASAP by Khan. Go and buy a copy and educate yourselves.

Films/TV

I have finally watched The Greatest Showman, after months and months of wanting to see it. It didn’t disappoint and is now on my mental list of films that I will watch when I’m feeling a bit rubbish.

This month, I feel like I’ve gone back in time to the noughties and am reliving my childhood through films. I’m not ashamed to say that this month I have happily watched The Princess Diaries 1 and 2, Cheaper By The Dozen and Matilda more than once.

Since becoming unwell, I’ve been watching more videos on YouTube to keep me entertained. The Mandeville Sisters are great and I especially like how open they are around disability, mental health and their own body insecurities. The added bonus is that their videos are normally quite short so I don’t lose focus half way through.

Spoonie Favourites

This month, I had been planning on going to my second EDS meet up, held locally to where I live. These groups are run by EDS UK and I honestly cannot recommend them enough. However, my body had other ideas about going to the meeting and I was struck with a bad infection, but I wanted to mention the groups anyway, for people who might be reading this and are unaware of the groups. Living with EDS can be very isolating at times and whilst I’ve “met” plenty of people online with EDS and am very lucky to have my best friend, who also has EDS, the group has allowed me to connect with more people who live close to me. Having EDS is an on-going journey and I think I’ll always be learning about the condition and the best ways of managing it, but ideas and advice are shared in the group meetings and I’ve been given advice and support that I hadn’t considered myself.

At the start of this month, I was officially diagnosed with Gastroparesis. As my list of medical conditions grows and grows, I decided that the time had come for me to purchase some awareness cards, which I can carry around with me, in the event that I should fall ill away from home.

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These  cards are on top of a new medical ID bracelet that I purchased a few weeks ago. Funny story, I was a bit off my face on morphine at the time of buying my ID bracelet,

I didn’t realise that 1) it was an American site and that I was paying in dollars, not pounds, 2) it cost over $80 3) there would be a hefty customs  charge when the bloody thing  arrived in England. Don’t go shopping after taking morphine, kids. Although, as my friend pointed out, I managed to spell everything correctly and write the correct name for myself, so that’s one positive.

Whilst there is still a level of anxiety over leaving the house alone or being with people who don’t have a good understanding over my health, but the combination of the Stickman Communications cards and my ID bracelet has made me feel more at ease, should something ever happen to me.

Odds and Sods

Along with buying books with my Amazon voucher, I also bought a CD. Retro I know, but I prefer to listen to music in the car, as opposed to radio. Since seeing Pitch Perfect 3 in the cinema at the beginning of the year, I have re-discovered my love of The Cranberries, so I bought their greatest hits CD. The result of this is I will drive out of my way on journeys so that I can listen to more of the CD.

Towards the end of last month, I went to stay with my best friend for a few days. She had already introduced me to the wonderful pyjamas at Matalan, so when she suggested that we went on a trip to Matalan, I was not going to refuse. A girl can never have too many pairs of pyjamas. Sadly their pyjama range wasn’t that great but I fell in love with their home wear section and could have bought half the shop, had it not been for my small suitcase and needing to cross London to get back home. The quality of their products is so good and are fairly inexpensive. A quick Google later and I discovered that there’s a Matalan fairly close to me, which I have now visited a couple of times. A definite convert.

It’s been a while since I talked about how much I love The Body Shop, so I should probably rectify that. The Body Shop have recently brought out a new body lotion, which they are calling a body yogurt. I bought the almond flavour, as I’m finding that I’m struggling with sensory overload a bit and the almond scent is very mild and doesn’t invade my nostrils too much. Would definitely recommend.

My final favourite for this month is the general blogging community over on Facebook. Through this community, I have met so many like-minded people, learnt how to develop my blog and writing for an audience and had the space to talk about content and what people want to read about. Big thanks to the people who give up their time to facilitate the groups which allow this to happen.

 

Universal Credit Saga – Part Four

The issues regarding universal credit have been continuing behind the scenes, over the past few weeks.

At the beginning of May, I had another commitment meeting, with my work coach. During this meeting, I handed in my latest copy of my fit note (also known as a sick note), now stating that I officially have gastroparesis. My work coach asked me if I was feeling better, I explained that things were much the same, hence the fit note. He looked a bit confused at the fact that I wasn’t getting any better: chronic illnesses are clearly a complex thing for people to get their heads around. There isn’t any “soon” in terms of me getting well. He asked me again if I could predict when I would be better and able to start work, so yet again, I explained very simply that I have long term chronic illnesses for which there is not a cure. I can not pick a random date and hope to be better by then, because that is not my reality.

So, yet again we went round in circles, with my work coach saying that he needed to in-put a date about when I would be better and he reminded me that on the system, I am available to attend interviews immediately and I am available to start work immediately. The computer did not randomly select these dates, my work coach in-putted into the system that I am available immediately, despite the medical evidence from three different medical professionals stating otherwise and me arguing that. He wasn’t very impressed when I informed him that not only have I not been job searching, but I have not attended any interviews and have not made any process in terms of getting a job.

You guessed it: I explained, for what feels like the billionth time, that I am very unwell. I am being sick every day, I am malnourished, I am exhausted, emotionally I am really struggling and actually, in no way am I fit to be in work. Despite all of this, I still desperately want to be working, to the point that I am now having literal dreams where I have a job. I still feel like a failure and a burden on people around me. I feel like I don’t have a purpose in life and I don’t know why I bother getting out of bed from one day to the next.

By the time that I had finished explaining this to my work coach, I had lost my shit a little bit, although somehow I managed to hold back the tears. I am so fed up of constantly needing to explain myself and being open to judgement by a man who does not know me and patronises me by telling me that he understands. Unless you have actually gone through this living hell, please don’t tell me that you understand because you don’t. Until everything that you have worked towards and aimed for in life has been taken away from you and you don’t know from one day to the next how sick you’re going to be, or whether you’re going to need medical treatment, don’t tell me that you understand.

After saying all of this to my work coach, he promptly turned around and told me that he didn’t feel that he needs to see me again. Naturally, this news delighted me but I was a little bit hurt when he said that he “couldn’t help me”. Maybe start listening and offer some support, instead of making me feel like crap? Just an idea.

So, things were left, I wasn’t sure what was happening but due to picking up an infection, I wasn’t well enough to start chasing a system which is more broken than me. I had received a form, in the post, which I had to fill in to tell people about my disability. Thankfully, it was a similar form to the PIP form so it didn’t hurt my somewhat foggy brain too much. I filled it in and then received an “invitation” to attend a work capability assessment.

And then, on the 23rd May, everything changed with one single phone call. I had contacted my local MP the previous day, so let her know that I was still awaiting a reply from the DWP, regarding the letter that I sent to Theresa May and she replied, letting me know that she would chase it again.

I received a phone call from the Department of Work and Pensions, attached to parliament. I was given a formal apology for how I have been treated in regards to my universal credit application and for any “undue and additional stress” that my treatment has caused. All of my work commitments have been stopped: I no longer have to be spending two hours a day job hunting, I don’t have to keep updating my CV, I don’t have to attend interviews and it has been agreed that I am currently too unwell to be working.

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At last, someone with some common sense! I want to cry with sheer relief that finally, someone has listened to me. I’m also incredibly grateful that Layla Moran MP has given her time to fight on my behalf because I’m 99.9% sure that the common sense has prevailed due to her involvement.

think that I still need to go through the formality of the work capability assessment, but I’m not totally sure. Either way, I’m not too worried about it now. Prior to the phone call, I knew that I would be attending the assessment with my work coach having said that I should be working and I knew that it would have been a tough job to get the assessor to think otherwise. But now that it’s been recognised that not only am I genuinely ill but also too unwell to work, my understanding is that the assessment is more of a box ticking exercise, a bit like PIP assessments.

This doesn’t mean that I’m going to stop fighting. There is still so many things wrong with a system which is [in theory] designed to help people. But instead, it’s failing people. It’s making people feel worthless and that is what needs to change. A work coach’s opinion should not outweigh medical evidence. Medical fact. If you are presenting with three different types of medical evidence, all stating that you are unfit for work, it is not down to someone without a medical degree to decide otherwise. I’m not sure what training you need to adhere to, in order to become a work coach, but I am fairly certain that it is not five plus years in medical school. Maybe it’s time that the knowledge and expertise of medical professionals is trusted, in the cases of people presenting with chronic, long term medical conditions.

Universal credit still has three major flaws, and until they are addressed, my experiences will be mirrored in other people, which is not okay. People are waiting up to 12 weeks for their first payment. That is three months without any income, potentially risking rent arrears, debt, financial insecurity, missing mortgage repayments and not being able to buy essential daily living items such as food, gas, electricity and water. Universal credit is also bloody complicated. People don’t understand it. I don’t understand it and the majority of the time, I have not had a clue what is happening and if I have been entitled to money. Because of this, people are not getting the help that they need and deserve because the system is failing them. It is failing the most vulnerable people in society, the people how don’t have a voice.

That is why I’m using my voice because I refuse to be silenced by a broken system.