Universal Credit Saga – Part Seven

It’s been a while since I had anything to say about universal credit. Mostly this is because I haven’t felt well enough to battle the broken system and for the most part, it hadn’t been causing me any issues, personally, so my feelings and views on it have been forced to take a back seat.

That was, until this past month. I check my bank account regularly because I don’t trust the benefits system to continuously pay me without any issues. When I checked my bank account a few weeks ago, I realised that I wasn’t paid my last universal credit payment, meaning that I was very overdrawn. It’s been an expensive few weeks with birthdays and various other things so my outgoings were higher than normal but that still didn’t explain how I was so massively overdrawn.

I’ve always been very careful with my money and budgeting was a skill that was instilled into me as a teenager. Finding out that I was overdrawn caused a whole new level of anxiety but I pulled myself together and went to the job centre to ask where the hell my money was at.

If you’ve been a regular follower of the universal credit sage, you’ll know that my experiences at the job centre have been less than positive: I’d like to say that this time things were different but that was not the case. I explained, very calmly, to the work coach that my payment hadn’t gone in and as a result, I was overdrawn. I kid you not, the work coach shrugged in reply and told me that “these things happen”. There have been admin issues over the past few weeks, which has meant that not all payments have gone out on time. Admin errors happen, what I am more frustrated about has been the sheer lack of communication, so I had no idea that this was the case.

I told the work coach, again, that I was overdrawn as a result of the payment not going on and was told that I would benefit from seeking advice from the Money Advice Service. The Money Advice Service is an organisation established with cross Government party support, that provides free and impartial advice on money and financial decisions to people in the United Kingdom. It is a really useful service, but not a service that I require at this time, because when my payments go in, I am very able at managing my own money. It’s very hard, however, to manage you’re money when you’re not receiving the money in the first place.

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I thought that things were taking a more positive turn when the work coach asked me if I needed vouchers so that I could access the food bank. The situation that I’m in means that actually, I don’t need them, because I eat very little due to gastroparesis, and the supplement drinks that I have are on prescription. This is where it gets interesting: the average person will spend between £15 and £20 per week on food shopping. The job centre were offering me a £5 voucher, to last me a month. That is not enough to cover even the very basic amounts of food that I am able to eat.

 

This left me in a somewhat desperate situation. By the time I got home, I was in tears because of anxiety and felt pretty ill, in general. With my mum’s help, the situation was de-escalated and we agreed that she would lend me some money to help me until my next payment date.

The end result has been that I had a double payment on my most recent payment date, so financially, I’m back to where I should be.

Universal Credit makes people vulnerable. You’re constantly at the mercy of an admin system that may or may not work. And when it doesn’t work, things can go really wrong. People can so easily end up in rent arrears, which can put their housing at risk. Mortgage repayments can be missed. Bills don’t get paid. So many people expected that Universal Credit would be a Universal Failure, however the scale of the failure really is shocking. It has cost four times as much to run per person as predict, at approximately £700 per claim. A fifth of claimants’ payments have been delayed and it is pushing unsustainable burdens onto local authorities to pick up the pieces when it does go wrong. Food banks, churches and charities are having to support increasing numbers of people, yet despite all of this, we are told that we are too far along with the process now, for it to be reversed. Universal credit hasn’t been rolled out across the whole country yet, so all these failures are set to increase further by 2023, when the rollout is set to be completed.

All these reasons are why I want to be working and not living off the state. Ten months on from the start of my experiences with universal credit and I still feel like a failure.

 

 

Effective Treatment Pathways For EDS

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One of the hardest things that I have found, since being diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is that there isn’t a clear treatment pathway or anyone overseeing my care. I am speaking as someone living in the south of England, this could well be different in other parts of the world and treatment various depending on where in the UK you live. This means that I don’t have anyone officially overseeing my care and treatment and instead, my treatment is scattered across numerous hospitals and departments and places in the country. I live in Oxfordshire, but receive treatment in London, as well as Oxford and I am under many specialists including physiotherapy, cardiology, infectious diseases and fatigue clinic, gastroenterology (in Oxford and London), rheumatology, urology, genetics and orthopaedics.

Very often, patients with EDS who are over the age of 18 have little or no care within the NHS. Healthcare workers and providers have no access to formal training, resulting in patients needing to self fund private care with the few specialists available, in order to manage their multiple,painful & life threatening disabilities.

I am really fortunate in the respect of being able to afford private treatment, but that cannot be a forever option because I don’t have an endless supply of money. I have to self-fund my physiotherapy treatment and have been for over five years, because on the NHS, I am only entitled to six sessions before being discharged. EDS is a chronic and incurable illness, which will not and can not be made better with six sessions of generic physiotherapy. My physio is amazing and was the first person who picked up on the possibility of me having EDS; I would be lost without her, I need regular and intensive physiotherapy to keep my body moving and to try and reduce pain. Think of it as a car needing a service or MOT to make sure it’s working, only I need physio every two weeks, not once a year.

Likewise with gastroenterology, I have paid to see a private consultant in London because I was receiving such poor treatment in Oxfordshire. My local gastroenterology consultant hadn’t heard of EDS and mis-diagnosed me to that very reason, and it was only because my mum and I pushed for further tests that I was finally diagnosed with gastroparesis. Currently, this is being “managed” through medication and dietary changes, only I am not getting better and the risk is, the longer I am left like this, the harder it will be to access other recognised treatments for gastroparesis because I won’t be well enough.

More recently, I ended up in urinary retention, which was later discovered to be due to a kidney infection. I have suffered for years with kidney infections, the first one being when I was on a French exchange, where I ended up in hospital. Unfortunately, GCSE French doesn’t extent to explaining to a doctor this awful and unexplainable pain, but I could tell them that I lived with my mum and rabbit and that my favourite subject was English and that I did the hoovering at home.

There is a link between EDS and urinary retention, which I tried to explain when I was in hospital, whilst having three nurses peering at me down below, trying to shove a tube into the urethral opening. It really is as fun as it sounds. No-one was particularly bothered about the fact that it was likely that this was happening due to the fact that I have EDS: in simple terms, because I have EDS, I am extra stretchy, which includes organs etc. The bladder expands anyway when it is full, but it had over expanded meaning that it then couldn’t contract and empty. Again, really fun.

I found that having a catheter fitted incredibly traumatic and I was all for yanking it out myself, after consulting Dr Google and Dr YouTube, about self removal of catheters. The trauma aside, I was also very concerned about the risks of having a catheter, as an EDS patients. Because our bodily make-up is different, there is an increase risk that once a catheter is fitted, the bladder ceases to function normally, therefore becoming dependent on a catheter.

There is no continuity of care. I am lucky to have a GP who is on the ball and supportive, but being under over nine hospital departments can become confusing, especially when people have conflicting views and options and more so when professionals don’t know of or believe in EDS. Trust me, it’s a real thing. Each time you meet a new professional, you have to explain everything because there is so much which could be as a result of EDS. Having a designated health care professional overseeing care would make a huge difference to patients like me, but also friends who I have met who also have EDS and other chronic illnesses.

Why am I going on about this? Because, simply, it needs to change. No other disease in the history of modern medicine has been neglected in the way that Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome has been.

A government petition has been set up, to try and improve healthcare for patients with EDS and more importantly, to improve on education of EDS and its different types, so that medical professionals are more aware of it. It is thought that only 5% of EDS suffers are diagnosed, with only 31% of people diagnosed in under ten years from when they first became symptomatic.

This has got to change. Please take two minutes out of your day to sign the petition. It might not seem like much to you if you don’t have a diagnosis of EDS or know anyone with a diagnosis, but for EDS patients, this could be life changing.

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June Favourites

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Photo from spoonievillage calendar

 

Welcome to another monthly favourites post, looking at all the things I’ve been loving in June! At the time of writing this, it is exactly six months until Christmas and I’m not sorry to admit that I am somewhat pining for cold weather, fluffy jumpers and evenings with the fire lit. Hot weather doesn’t agree too well with my body. Anyway, on with my favourites for this month…

Books

Last month, I talked about I Am Thunder: And I Won’t Keep Quiet by Muhammad Khan and how much I loved it. It made me realise, however, how little I know about Islamic culture and a lot of what I did know, was based on new reports, which can give a very one-sided viewpoint. So, with that in mind, I decided to educate myself a little bit and find out more about Islamic culture, through the medium of books. After searching on Amazon, I came across Randa Abdel-Fattah, a litigation lawyer and human rights activist, living in Sydney. Her first book, Does My Head Look Big in This, follows the story of Amal, a sixteen year old living in Melbourne, who also happens to be a Muslim, struggling to honour the Islamic faith in a society that doesn’t understand it, following her decision to start wearing this hijab. The book is insightful, laugh out loud funny and at times, a bit of a tear jerker, and I’m not known for crying at books.

The second book by Abdel-Fattah that I read this month is The Lines We Cross. The book has a similar set up to Does My Head Look Big in This: it is set in an Australian secondary school and looks at how society perceives different cultures and religions, with anti-immigration rallies fighting against the raise of immigration into Australia. The flip side of this books looks at the story of an Afghani asylum seeker, who came to Australia on a boat, following besiegement of her home country and faces a negative reception from native Australians. Again, I would really recommend this book, despite it being a YA book, its themes are applicable to adults and teenagers alike.

A Quiet Kind of Thunder by Sara Barnard was another favourite this month. Steffi has been a selective mute for most of her life – she’s been silent for so long that she feels completely invisible. But Rhys, the new boy at school, sees her. He’s deaf, and her knowledge of basic sign language means that she’s assigned to look after him. Put simply, this book was beautiful and I loved the perspective from Rhys, looking at how deaf people feel and deal with the hearing world, as well as how Steffi manages her social anxiety and the assumptions made by people around her.

My final book favourite for this month is Because We Are Bad by Lily Bailey. Anyone who wants to know about OCD, and how to fight back, should read this book – it is an emotional, challenging read. Lily takes the reader deep into the heart of the illness but she is also a deft writer, and even the darkest moments are peppered with wit and wry observations. Having a diagnosis of OCD meant that, at times, this book was a little hard hitting but I appreciate Lily’s honesty and could really relate to aspects of the book.

Films/TV

 

Okay so I only have one favourite from film and TV this month which is…dun dun duuuunnnn…

LOVE ISLAND.

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I am obsessed with this series and the first thing that I do when I wake up in the morning is watch the previous night’s episode on catch up. My life simply would not be complete without the daily debriefs with friends. My standout moments so far are Hayley on Brexit (and trees) and Rosie’s sass towards Adam. I still haven’t got over Kendall being dumped from the villa and I don’t think I ever will.

Spoonie Favourites

 

The Body Shop has come up on top again this month, with their spoonie friendly makeup and cosmetic products. A lot of the time, I don’t have the energy to spend ages and ages doing my makeup of having a long beauty regime, but at the same time, I don’t want to get into a downward spiral of not making any effort. A complete life saver in hot weather has been their mandarin face mist, which hydrates skin and is makeup friendly. Great if you need a quick refresh without any effort.

Another life saver has been their aloe soothing moisture lotion, with SPF 15. If you’re anything like me, putting sun cream on your face will result in claggy and blocked pores and all the spots, so this is brilliant at protecting your skin without breaking out in twenty million spots. It’s designed for sensitive skin and is paraben and alcohol free.

Continuing on the theme of quick and easy makeup products, Soap and Glory Fake Awake has been a recent discovery and is brilliant at covering up my ever growing dark circles, with minimal effort and time.

 

What have your favourites been this month? I love finding out what other people have been loving and would recommend.

 

Happy 70th Birthday, NHS

NHS_70_logoOn the 5th July 2018, the NHS will be turning seventy years old: that’s seventy years of providing lifesaving healthcare to a ever growing British population.

As someone with numerous chronic and long term illnesses, I am incredibly grateful for the NHS. I’m not sure where I would be without it – probably in spiralling debt. There are, undoubtedly, criticisms regarding the NHS, but this is not down to the 1.3 million people who work for it, more down to the current state of politics, but this is not the time to talk politics and policies. So many of the people who work for the NHS go unnoticed and unthanked. They work tirelessly to keep the British population healthy. Regardless of health or wealth, we can be reassured that if we fall ill or have an accident, we will receive the treatment that we need.

NHS staff see the best and worst of people. They welcome babies in the world, sharing the joy with new parents and they administer end of life care, ensuring that people die with dignity and that the families are supported, during a time of grief, upheaval and turmoil. They are often dealing with people who are going through trauma and they do their best to relieve some of the pain and anxiety, felt by those needing medical care, as well as the people around them.

Needing medical care isn’t an alien experience for me. In fact, it’s the opposite, thanks to the fact that I am diagnosed with various long term medical conditions. But although I’m more familiar with the inside of my local A&E department and other departments in near-by hospitals, compared to most people my age, the familiarity doesn’t change the fact that it is still a frightening experience. But I can honestly say that I remember every single nurse who has looked after me on those occasions and ensured that I felt as safe and as calm as possible. This is not an easy task when you are overworked, underpaid and often unappreciated.

I can remember the nurse who held my hand during a particularly bad night, during one hospital admission. I was crying in pain, with pain relief not even beginning to lessen it and this one particular nurse sat with me until I was calm and we talked about my life, hopes and ambitions and things that I enjoyed. She told me that she had moved to England from Brazil because she was so desperate to work for the NHS.

I can remember the nurses and occasional therapists who went out of their way to ensure that I was at ease prior to me having surgery at the age of eight. They made me laugh and brought Guinea pigs into my room, as part of animal therapy. They also reassured me post-surgery when I was afraid and wanted my mum.

I can remember the health care assistant who apologised repeatedly when she had to cut me out of a Crew Clothing jumper, when I was on a spinal board, and then suggested that I wore cheaper clothes next time I ended up on a spinal board with a suspected fractured neck and bad concussion. Thankfully there hasn’t been a “next time” but the joking eased the fear.

It’s not just nurses who make the NHS as good as it is. There are so many people who do their job every single day and remain pretty much unnoticed. There are the porters walking miles every single day, making sure patients are where they need to be; from experience porters are some of the kindest and funniest people I’ve ever met. True NHS heroes.

I can’t write about the NHS without mentioning GPs, in particular, my own very wonderful GP. My GP has been my biggest supporter for over ten years. She has fought a near-constant battle for me to receive the correct treatment for my various conditions and has never once given up on me, even when I have very much given up on myself. When you are diagnosed with a rare condition, one of the biggest hurdles faced is the lack of understanding from medical professionals. Yet my GP knows my body as well as I do and has gone out of her way to research and find out more about my conditions, so that she is able to treat me in the best possible way.

So, I’d like to take this opportunity to take everyone who works for the NHS. Thank you for caring.

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This post has been written in conjunction with Scope and will be appearing on their website.

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Post: Gracie’s Gladiators

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This month’s guest post is written by Nattie. Nattie lives in the Midlands with her husband and two children, Grace and Amelie and her family is the perfect example of the wonder of blended families. Nattie works in with a PR company, specialising in event management. Life for Nattie’s family was turned upside down a few months ago, following Gracie being diagnosed with leukaemia.

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What can I say about Gracie? She’s 10 years old, absolutely gorgeous, funny, kind, intelligent, an animal lover, a fantastic big sister and a lover of hugs and cuddles. Gracie is also a cancer patient.

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Grace at the age of seven, blowing out candles.

Earlier this year, Grace was diagnosed with leukaemia. She had been poorly off and on since the winter and we, along with doctors, thought that it was a lingering viral infection. She was very tired, often coming home from school and falling asleep on the sofa until tea time. On top of this, she was also having a difficult time at school with friendships and she is starting to get anxious about moving to high school in September 2019. Nothing major but Gracie is sensitive and we know from past experiences that she doesn’t deal well with conflict or change, it emotionally drains her.

We were’t too worried. That is until her energy levels dropped further. Her teacher rang us to raise concerns: Grace was falling asleep in school and she wasn’t managing to take part in PE lessons, a lesson that she loved. In general, she was very wobbly and her balance was getting worse. She was sad, something very unlike Grace.

When Grace contracted her fifth cold since January, we felt that enough was enough: our previously healthy little girl was struggling and our instincts knew that something else was going on. We decided to keep her off school for a week. On day three of Grace’s week off school, she had a nose bleed, which would not stop. After the 15 minute marker, I ended up calling paramedics. Gracie was dizzy and faint and as the nose bleed continued, the colour was literally draining out of her. Deep down, I think I knew that I wasn’t calling paramedics just for a nose bleed, there was something bigger going on here.

This view was echoed by the paramedics, who told me, very kindly, that they felt that Grace needed to be in hospital now. Upon arriving, Grace had numerous blood tests and her obs and sats caused the doctors some concern.

After what can only be described as the longest wait I’ve ever endured, a paediatrition told me that I might want to consider calling my husband. I explained that he was due to pick up my younger daughter from school but would be here later. My world shattered a bit when I was told that David needed to be here now. Gracie was also asking for her daddy, in between sleeping and being confused. I rang David and told him to get to the hospital right now and then called on my fantastic friend, Essie, to ask her to collect Amelie from school and look after her until I knew more.

David arrived at the hospital and we were taken into a private room. This was the point where we were told that our beautiful little girl had cancer.

The prognosis was “good” we were told. If a child is going to get cancer, the cancer that Grace was suspected of having was the most easily treated, with high chances of going into remission.

In the space of a day, our lives went from talking about phonics and the girls’ homework, arguing over who was going to clean the guinea pig’s cages, telling the girls to eat their carrots, CBBC programmes and ballet classes to talking about chemotherapy, Hickman lines, Picc lines, steroids, bone marrow, blood transfusions and side effects.

Grace was very muddled when we told her. She understood that she was extremely poorly and would need to stay in hospital to get better. The extreme nature of her treatment plan was lost on her and we made the choice to only tell her what was completely necessary. She asked if her hair would fall out and we told her that it probably would. Grace new about the Little Princess Trust, thanks to Laura cutting her long locks a few years ago and she decided that she wanted to shave her hair ASAP and donate it. Her next question broke us, she asked in a tiny voice if she was going to die.

A ten year old child should not be having to think about their own mortality. David and I explained that all of the doctors and nurses were going to do everything possible to make her better and all she had to think about was fighting as hard as she could.

In the weeks since Grace’s diagnosis, she has had six blood transfusions and two platelet transfusions. She’s had three lots of bone marrow taken, four general anaesthetics, one of which was to place a line into her chest. She’s had more blood tests than I can count. She’s had different sorts of chemo, including having it injected into her spine, which made her very unwell. She’s been on steroids and is on a cocktail of medicines to try and fight this beast. She’s spent time in ICU  with suspected sepsis and has been so so sick. She has spent most of her time in hospital, only having half days at home here and there.

Side effects have included sickness and fevers. Her month and throat have been covered in large ulcers, making eating almost impossible. Grace has had headaches which have made her scream with pain. The combination of treatment and being bed bound has caused serious muscle wastage so now our once energetic and sporty little girl is confined to a wheelchair, on the rare occasions when she manages to get out of bed. The steroids made her angry and emotional, on top of making her sleep deprived and exhausted.

Then there was the hair loss. Nothing prepared us for that, even though we knew it would happen and had talked about it. Grace dealt with it better than us, simply rolling up the hair which had come out during the night and then saying “I think we should shave it because I don’t need my hair right now.” So that’s what we did. Grace has been rocking hats since then.

Amelie is struggling. At the age of seven, it’s a huge change to get used to and due to infection risk, she’s only been able to see Grace a handful of times. Our friends and family have been taking turns to move into the house, to look after Ame, to try and maintain some normality.

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Grace’s hair, ready to be sent off to The Little Princess Trust. Bye bye blonde locks. 

Ame and Grace’s school have been wonderful, fundraising to help us out as a family. Grace’s class write a letter to Grace every week to talk about what they’ve been doing. Even though she’s not at school at the moment, they still want her to feel included. Ame’s teacher, along with teaching assistants are giving her 1-2-1 time every day, to give her the time and space to talk. The nurses at the children’s hospital, where Grace is being treated, are also helping us to support Amelie and are helping her to understand what is happening to her big sister.

I’ll be honest, my reason for writing this is to ask for help. If you can give blood, please give blood. It takes less than an hour and will literally save a life. Prior to Grace becoming ill, I hadn’t ever stopped and considered how important blood donation is. The simple fact is, Grace would not be alive right now if it wasn’t for the wonderful people how have already donated blood and I wish that I could thank every one in person for saving my little girl’s life.

If you can’t donate blood, please consider donating to Rainbow Trust or the Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group – two charities which have hugely helped our family.

As a family, we are scared right now. It physically hurts seeing Grace so unwell and it hurts seeing Amelie so sad and confused about what’s happening to her sister. Forcing your child to go through procedures which you know are going to cause pain goes against everything you believe in, as a mother. But the alternative is so much worse. I hate seeing Grace in pain and scared. I hate hearing her cries but I hope that one day, she will understand that it was all necessary to make her better. We know that we have a long journey ahead of us but our unconventional little family will only get stronger during this fight. We are Gracie’s Gladiators and we will not give up the fight.

 

Universal Credit Saga – Part Five

Welcome to your latest round-up on all things universal credit. Grab yourself a cup of tea or something stronger and get ready to find out more on the mind-fuck that is applying for universal credit.

Last week, I had my work capability assessment. I had a bit of an anxiety meltdown the morning of the assessment, basically crying because if the assessment doesn’t go my way, I am royally screwed. I think a lot of my fear stemmed back to validation and the fact that essentially, my future financial security, sanity and hopes were pinned on the decision of a stranger, who had never met me and that decision would overrule any made my medical professions, who are involved in my on-going care. As a result of my meltdown, my mum offered to come with me to the assessment, but would stay in the waiting room. This eased my fears slightly and off we trekked to the assessment centre, in the pouring rain, with me feeling like I was going to vomit. Plastic bags were packed just in case, although vomiting everywhere would only have strengthened my case.

The waiting room was typically British, only with more mobility aids and a smell of damp because we all resembled drowned rats. Everyone was moaning because the assessors were running late: two people lost the will to live and rearranged their appointments and the children belonging to the family who (I can only assume) thought that a trip to a health assessment centre was akin to a day out at the zoo, tried to pretend that their lives hadn’t ended during the hours waiting for their dad to finish in his assessment.

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Anyway. I was eventually seen and was in and out within half an hour. I was asked how my disability impacts on my day to day life, was told that I looked tired (no really?!) and was then asked if I could perform various movements: reaching up, making fists and then touching the floor. Hypermobile me excelled at this – my shoulders popped in and out as I reached up and I freaked the assessor out with how easily I could touch the floor, with my palms flat.

And that was it. I went home, got into bed and slept a solid 14 hours before rolling out of bed and going to a GP appointment.

Fast forward to today and I had the unenviably fun task of going to the job centre and handing in my latest fit note. I thought that it was going to be a simple case of handing it in and then leaving, but oh no, today I had the added fun of not only meeting a new work coach (I think my last one binned me off, can’t think why…) and then going through all my work commitments. Now, at this point, I would like to remind you of the phone call I received a few weeks ago, whereby I was told that all my work commitments had been switched off because I’m not fit to be working or searching for jobs. It would seem that my joy over someone having some common sense was short-lived: my work commitments haven’t been switched off and actually, I am still meant to be spending at least two hours a day job searching and keeping my CV up to date.

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I am so bloody confused.

Things got even better when my new work coach asked me if it was “just sickness” that was stopping me from working. Oh how I laughed, because that is properly funny. I explained in very simple terms, that even a halfwit could understand, that gastroparesis means paralysis of the digestive system and symptoms include but are not restricted to sickness and nausea, extreme bloating, pain and heartburn. The consequences of gastroparesis include being malnourished, which I am. Due to malnourishment, I am so exhausted that I frequently cannot stand up without my legs giving way, I’m constantly freezing cold, my skin is an attractive creamy-grey, my eyes have bigger bags that I knew was possible and I have bald patches where my hair as fallen out. Not to mention how much this is impacting on my already fragile mental health.

Apparently, I should find out within four weeks what the outcome is from my work assessment. I’m really apprehensive about it and it shows how broken the system is when the opinion of someone who has had a twenty minute conversation with me and then asked me to show off some of my EDS party tricks outweighs the opinions of my GP who has known me ten plus years, my physio who is specialised in chronic conditions, my gastro consultant who is the top consultant at the hospital and my therapist who has known me for three years. How is that right? Or fair?

Today I was told that the job centre would have a supportive role, regardless of the outcome. Thus far, their input has not been supportive, it has made me more unwell, stressed, anxious, depressed and I have been so close to giving up.

I mean, should the result be that I need to be in work, I could appeal but I’m now getting to the point where I’m really losing my fight. I know that, deep down, I have to keep fighting this, for me and everyone else caught out by a completely unjust system, but right now, I feel so defeated. I don’t even feel angry regarding my appointment today, just sad and exhausted.

Forcing someone into work, against the advice of professionals, isn’t supportive. This system is not supportive. This system is failing.

May Favourites

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Welcome to another monthly favourites post, looking at all the things I’ve been loving in May! I can’t believe how quickly this year is going, I feel a bit rubbish that so far, I’m yet to really achieve anything in 2018, but the additional free time that I have had, has allowed me to discover new things, which I guess is a good thing. As you will have seen by the blog posts that I have been posting this month, May is Ehlers-Danlos Awareness Month, so some of my favourites from this month will be continuing with that theme.

Books

Like last month, I’ve mainly stuck to young adult (YA) fiction this month because I’ve been massively struggling with brain fog, which has affected my ability to concentrate and take in anything where I am required to think.

Last month, I received my first “payment” for writing, in the form of an Amazon voucher. In the grand scheme of things, this isn’t massively exciting but I’m pretty proud of myself. After some consideration, I decided to buy myself some books, because you can never have too many books. So, thanks to my Amazon voucher, I discovered Non Pratt, a fab YA author and I have made my way through Second Best Friend, Trouble and Unboxed. Second Best Friend and Unboxed were a pretty easy reads, for me, having only just over 100 pages, so I started and finished them both within the space of one afternoon. Neither of the books were especially stand out, although they were witty in places, but my reason for mentioning them is down to the fact that they are perfect for readers with dyslexia, with yellowed pages and a unique font. Not enough books are published with dyslexia suffers in mind but these books are accessible and age appropriate: struggling with reading does not mean that you should be stuck reading children’s books.

If you’ve read any of my previous monthly favourites blog posts, you’ll know that I am a huge fan of Cat Clarke, so it was a happy coincidence that I stumbled across Non Pratt, as a recommended author for people who love Cat Clarke’s books.

Speaking of Cat Clarke, her latest book We Are Young came out this month resulting in me sending a very excited message to Life of Pippa to inform her. I read the book in one day and I loved it. It’s a close call between We Are Young and Girlhood over my favourite Cat Clarke book. We Are Young was emotional, raw, powerful…I could continue, and I can’t wait until Cat’s next book is out. No pressure Cat!

One of my stand-out books of the year (bold statement, I know) has to be I Am Thunder: And I Won’t Keep Quiet by Muhammad Khan. Put simply: this book was amazing, literally the only fault that I could find with it is that it finished too soon. Despite this book again coming under the YA category of fiction, I honestly feel that everyone needs to read it. Muhammad Khan is a teacher in a British secondary school. He is also Muslim and writes about growing up as a British Muslim in the 21st century, having been inspired by media reports of the three Muslim girls who fled east London to join the so-called Islamic State. I don’t want to go into too much detail over the plot, however I will say that I learnt a great deal from the book and there needs to be more books ASAP by Khan. Go and buy a copy and educate yourselves.

Films/TV

I have finally watched The Greatest Showman, after months and months of wanting to see it. It didn’t disappoint and is now on my mental list of films that I will watch when I’m feeling a bit rubbish.

This month, I feel like I’ve gone back in time to the noughties and am reliving my childhood through films. I’m not ashamed to say that this month I have happily watched The Princess Diaries 1 and 2, Cheaper By The Dozen and Matilda more than once.

Since becoming unwell, I’ve been watching more videos on YouTube to keep me entertained. The Mandeville Sisters are great and I especially like how open they are around disability, mental health and their own body insecurities. The added bonus is that their videos are normally quite short so I don’t lose focus half way through.

Spoonie Favourites

This month, I had been planning on going to my second EDS meet up, held locally to where I live. These groups are run by EDS UK and I honestly cannot recommend them enough. However, my body had other ideas about going to the meeting and I was struck with a bad infection, but I wanted to mention the groups anyway, for people who might be reading this and are unaware of the groups. Living with EDS can be very isolating at times and whilst I’ve “met” plenty of people online with EDS and am very lucky to have my best friend, who also has EDS, the group has allowed me to connect with more people who live close to me. Having EDS is an on-going journey and I think I’ll always be learning about the condition and the best ways of managing it, but ideas and advice are shared in the group meetings and I’ve been given advice and support that I hadn’t considered myself.

At the start of this month, I was officially diagnosed with Gastroparesis. As my list of medical conditions grows and grows, I decided that the time had come for me to purchase some awareness cards, which I can carry around with me, in the event that I should fall ill away from home.

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These  cards are on top of a new medical ID bracelet that I purchased a few weeks ago. Funny story, I was a bit off my face on morphine at the time of buying my ID bracelet,

I didn’t realise that 1) it was an American site and that I was paying in dollars, not pounds, 2) it cost over $80 3) there would be a hefty customs  charge when the bloody thing  arrived in England. Don’t go shopping after taking morphine, kids. Although, as my friend pointed out, I managed to spell everything correctly and write the correct name for myself, so that’s one positive.

Whilst there is still a level of anxiety over leaving the house alone or being with people who don’t have a good understanding over my health, but the combination of the Stickman Communications cards and my ID bracelet has made me feel more at ease, should something ever happen to me.

Odds and Sods

Along with buying books with my Amazon voucher, I also bought a CD. Retro I know, but I prefer to listen to music in the car, as opposed to radio. Since seeing Pitch Perfect 3 in the cinema at the beginning of the year, I have re-discovered my love of The Cranberries, so I bought their greatest hits CD. The result of this is I will drive out of my way on journeys so that I can listen to more of the CD.

Towards the end of last month, I went to stay with my best friend for a few days. She had already introduced me to the wonderful pyjamas at Matalan, so when she suggested that we went on a trip to Matalan, I was not going to refuse. A girl can never have too many pairs of pyjamas. Sadly their pyjama range wasn’t that great but I fell in love with their home wear section and could have bought half the shop, had it not been for my small suitcase and needing to cross London to get back home. The quality of their products is so good and are fairly inexpensive. A quick Google later and I discovered that there’s a Matalan fairly close to me, which I have now visited a couple of times. A definite convert.

It’s been a while since I talked about how much I love The Body Shop, so I should probably rectify that. The Body Shop have recently brought out a new body lotion, which they are calling a body yogurt. I bought the almond flavour, as I’m finding that I’m struggling with sensory overload a bit and the almond scent is very mild and doesn’t invade my nostrils too much. Would definitely recommend.

My final favourite for this month is the general blogging community over on Facebook. Through this community, I have met so many like-minded people, learnt how to develop my blog and writing for an audience and had the space to talk about content and what people want to read about. Big thanks to the people who give up their time to facilitate the groups which allow this to happen.