Ehlers Danlos Awareness Month – FAQ

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May is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Awareness Month, and so far, I have been pretty quiet about it. However, now seems like a good time to answer some questions about EDS, that I am frequently asked.

What is EDS?

Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of rare inherited conditions that affect connective tissue in the body. Connective tissues provide support in skin, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, internal organs and bones and make up over 20% of our bodies. There are 13 different types of EDS, caused by faults in certain genes that make connective tissue weaker. Depending on the type of EDS, the faulty gene may have been inherited from one parent, or both parents, or in some cases, the faulty gene isn’t inherited and can occur in a person for the first time. The most common type of EDS is Hypermobile EDS (hEDS, formally known as type 3) . Rarer types include classical EDS, vascular EDS and kyphoscoliotic EDS.

Does it hurt?

The simple answer to this is yes, it does hurt. I am on painkillers daily. These reduce some of the pain and symptoms that I experience but they don’t get rid of them. In some ways, I’ve got used to being in pain, so a lot of the time, I’m able to block it out and I’ve learnt to live my life around pain. I’ve got a fairly high pain threshold (never cried after breaking a bone kind of high). When I have an EDS flare, things can become more difficult because my pain levels become harder to manage. In these situations, I often have to increase the medication that I take and I’m usually found attached to a heat pack or hot water bottle. Increasing medication comes with its own issues, such as more side effects, so taking more medication isn’t something that I like to do.

Have you tried…?

Probably, yes. I have tried so many things to try and alleviate symptoms, with varying levels of success. Kale hasn’t cured me, nor has a clean eating diet. Similarly, eating quinoa hasn’t cured me. Different things work for different people, EDS affects every single person differently, so whilst a hot bath with epsom salts works for me, it might not work for one of my friends. Aside from medication and heat therapy, I have regular physiotherapy appointments, where my joints/tendons are put back into place or I have ultra-sound therapy, which is a non-invasive way of reducing inflammation in the body.

How did you catch it?

I didn’t. I was born this way baby. Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes are genetic conditions, so I have had EDS all of my life, I just didn’t know. As far as I know, no one else in my family has EDS, meaning that despite being symptomatic since the age of nine or ten, I wasn’t diagnosed until the age of twenty two, as no one was looking for it, or suspected it. EDS is also classed as a rare disease, which makes the diagnostic process longer and more complicated. On average, it takes ten years for a person to be diagnosed with EDS, from the first onset of symptoms. EDS UK ran an awareness campaign highlighting the length of time it takes to receive a diagnosis of EDS. You can watch the video here.

Can you have children?

I have no idea, mainly because I’m not in a position whereby I am trying to have children. However, the diagnosis of EDS in itself does not stop you from having children, but it can lead to a higher risk of complications for the mother and baby. I am very mixed about wanting to have children. In an ideal world, I would love to have children and I would love to be able to conceive naturally, but I am mindful of the fact that EDS if genetic, so there is a 50% chance that I could pass it on. I wouldn’t wish this condition on anyone and that includes any future children. EDS is an unpredictable beast: some days I am absolutely fine, with minimal restrictions, other days I can’t move from my bed and require care from another person for basic daily tasks. Having worked with children and young people who are young carers, that has to be something I will need to consider. Hopefully in time, I will be in a better position to properly decide what is best, because right now, I don’t have the answer.

When will you get better?

I won’t and I find it so difficult when people ask this question or say that they hope I get well soon, because I am not going to get better, in the conventional sense. I have periods of time when things are more manageable, and I lead a fairly normal life but the downside to that is the inevitable payback. And payback is a bit. In the five years since being diagnosed, my health has declined hugely, although that isn’t completely down to EDS, but also co-morbidities, such as gastroparesis and POTS. A future with EDS is sometimes quite scary to think about because I don’t know from one day to the next how functioning my body will be, but I have to remain hopeful that treatment options will improve with time and research.

Will you die from it?

This is probably the worst question that I have been asked, in relation to EDS and it’s such an important one to answer because of that. To make this question hit even harder, it was asked by a paramedic, whilst I was being rushed into hospital by ambulance. I reminded him that this job is to try and prevent me from dying. I know that he was asking out of curiosity because he hadn’t treated a patient with EDS before, but there’s a time and place. As I said above. there are 13 different types of EDS and vascular EDS can be life limiting due to the possibility of organ and vessel rupture. Life expectancy is not usually shortened with other forms of EDS. That said, conditions that are co-morbid with EDS can impact on life expectancy. If you have gastroparesis for instance and have intestinal failure as a result, the sad fact is that death from a lack of nutrition can and does happen. EDS can, in many cases, cause progressive deterioration and degeneration of connective tissue in joints, spine, eye, gums, teeth, internal organs, and central nervous system. No one with EDS knowns what the future holds and emotionally, that is a big thing to deal with.

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One thought on “Ehlers Danlos Awareness Month – FAQ

  1. […] As above. I wrote a blog post recently, about frequently asked questioned that people with EDS get asked and I touched on the baby and child thing in that. In short, yes, I would like children, but I have to consider the risks to myself, but more importantly my child. EDS complicates things a bit. I’ve said more about the whole thing here. […]

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