Gastroparesis Awareness Month – Sarah’s Story

Gastro what? That was my initial reaction to my doctor’s suggestion that a condition called gastroparesis may be causing my symptoms of nausea, reflux, stomach pain, bloating and vomiting. I had also lost a significant amount of weight taking me from a healthy BMI down to a BMI in the 13’s at my worst. Having been back and forth to the GP and gastroenterologist for over a year and a half I was desperate for an answer. Naively I thought an answer would mean a cure. That evening I took my prescription of domperidone home and opened up the NHS website, carefully typing in gastroparesis. As I read through the symptoms I ticked each one off, I didn’t know whether to celebrate or commiserate, here was my answer after all this time. But there is no cure.

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Now, I’m no stranger to chronic illness, having already been diagnosed with M.E/CFS, endometriosis, IBS and POTS. But my gastroparesis diagnosis was the hardest to accept as it is such a change to everyday life. Gastroparesis translates to stomach paralysis, meaning the stomach does not contract properly to move food through into the small bowel: it is thought to be caused by damage to the vagus nerve, however gastroparesis is still a little understood condition. For some patients they are able to eat small, frequent amounts of easily digestible foods and manage their symptoms with no medication just dietary changes. For some patients they take medications called prokinetic medications which help encourage the stomach to contract and empty, so they are able to eat more normally again, many patients also take antiemetic medications to stop them feeling or being sick. Some patients manage on a purée diet, others a full liquid diet. For the more severely affected patients their nutrition will be artificial in the form of either oral nutrition supplements (ONS), tube feeds (enteral nutrition) or sterile liquid nutrition IV (parenteral nutrition).

On the 6th  of March 2017 I finally had my gastric emptying study, I sat up in nuclear medicine eating my radioactive cottage pie, Sainsbury’s Basic, and stood in front of a scanner at regular intervals to see how much of the radioactive mash potato in my stomach. I felt like the test went on forever. For a few weeks before I hadn’t been allowed certain medications and on the morning of the study I wasn’t allowed anything to eat or drink, including my usual medication for my nausea. Consequently I spent the hours of the study feeling increasingly ill and was relieved when I was finally allowed to go, I didn’t even get my foot out of the door before taking my antiemetic tablet!

Just three days later, the 9th of March 2017, I was diagnosed with gastroparesis. I had been admitted to hospital to begin tube feedings after over a year of supplement drinks and ever decreasing weight and blood results. I initially started with a nasogastric (NG) tube, which slowly dripped a liquid feed into my stomach for 20 hours a day. After a few months it was apparent that the NG was not the right option for me, I wasn’t tolerating my feed and was therefore losing yet more weight. Next up was the nasojejunal (NJ) which was placed into the jejunum which is the second portion of the small intestine. My first one was placed as an outpatient procedure which unfortunately went a little off plan, somehow some bacteria got in with the tube and I ended up with a particularly nasty gastrointestinal infection which resulted in one home visit from an out of hours GP, two ambulances to A&E and another 10 day hospital admission. I left hospital half a stone lighter with an NG tube and a plan to retry the NJ tube in a few weeks as an inpatient for the sake of safety. Luckily the second time round everything went smoothly and after a number of weeks and a feed change I was finally feeling a little better! A few days short of a year after my first NG was placed my feeding tube was changed from the temporary NJ tube to a more permanent PEGJ (Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy with Jejunal extension), a feeding tube placed through the skin of your abdomen, through your abdominal wall and  into your stomach with another thinner tube inside which travels down into the jejunum. This allows access to the jejunum for feeds and the stomach for venting gas and draining bile, acid and built up stomach contents.

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At the time of starting tube feeding I was terrified, at the age of 25 I had spoken to my Mum about what I wanted my funeral to be like. I had lost my job from simply being too poorly to get out of bed and go to work most days, often having six weeks at a time off. But honestly, I’m so glad I consented to the tube feeds. Between the feeds and the right combination of medication I’ve got my life back. I once again have the energy to have days out (albeit in my wheelchair due to my other conditions), spend time with family and friends and have even met the most wonderful man who loves me despite my illnesses, wheelchair and feeding tubes both NJ and PEGJ. I’m also a hell of a lot stronger, I’ve met some lovely people I now consider good friends and appreciate life so much more. At the time of receiving my gastroparesis diagnosis I thought my life was ending. But really it was just starting again.

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