EDS Awareness Month: Stupid Injuries

EDS awareness

Prior to being diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, I had a bit of a reputation of being a clumsy child. When I was in secondary school, my mum used to challenge me, at the start of every school term, to try and stay out of the local minor injuries unit and A&E majors and the trauma unit. I never succeeded. My PE teachers would despair each time I sustained a new injury, the school matron was sick of the sight of me and I’m fairly sure that I had my own supply for ice packs, because I went through so many.

Now that I have been diagnosed with EDS, the catalogue of injuries has grown but people are a little bit more understanding, although I do have to remind people that actually, I’m not clumsy, my body is just a bit wonky – I’m more prone to joint dislocations and broken bones – and sometimes, I’m simply very unlucky!

It would be a physical impossibility for me to go into all of my injuries. The nature of EDS means that I suffer from dislocations or subluxations every single day, often by doing nothing. I asked my mum for help when writing this because my memory isn’t the best at the moment. Her reply was “God. I don’t know, Laura, there is. So. Bloody. Much!” Instead, I’m going to explain some of the more memorable injuries that I’ve experienced in my twenty-five and a half years on planet earth. Looking back on my collection of injuries makes me incredibly grateful for the NHS and all of its fabulous staff.

I snapped the tendons in my little finger moving a piece of drama equipment in an after school drama club. I have no idea why, but I swear finger injuries are some of the most painful that I have sustained. This was my first finger injury and I found it pretty traumatic! I showed my friend my very very wonky and misshapen finger, whilst trying not to faint, she got the drama teachers to help and all I can really remember after that is being carried out of the drama studio, with my drama teacher singing songs from Oliver! as I continued trying not to faint. A senior member of staff offered to put my finger back into the joint, which I declined.

My friend dislocated and snapped the tendon in my index finger in a year 11 French lesson. I have talked about this injury in a blog post already and I can confirm that my poor friend is still teased endlessly about putting me in hospital and I still remind her of this injury when I want her to buy the first round of drinks in the pub.

More recently, I snapped the tendon in my index finger again, by picking a towel off the bathroom floor. You can imagine the looks that I received from medical staff in the minor injuries unit when I explained to them how I sustained this injury. Because picking up a towel from the floor is a very very dangerous exercise. The injury was more complicated than initially thought, meaning that I needed my whole hand splinted as it was the main tendon that I snapped, not the tendon at the tip of my finger. On reflection, I’m lucky that it has healed as well as it has done, because the injury wasn’t treated quickly, meaning that surgery was likely. As always, I like to prove people wrong!

A couple of months ago, I caught my little toe in my duvet and it dislocated. Not only did I managed to dislocate my toe, I somehow sustained a hair line fracture in my foot at the same time. I honestly have no idea how this happened.

Last year, I went to see Russell Howard on tour with one of my close friends. He was hilarious, I love that man. And I laughed so much that I dislocated my top rib on the right hand side of my body. It wasn’t especially painful but it put quite a bit of pressure on my lung. Unfortunately, I didn’t have enough sense to see my physiotherapist as soon as possible after this happened, so my rib ended up moving and sticking up, underneath my collar bone, which made relocating it difficult.

Speaking of ribs, there was also the perilous massage, that I experienced a few weeks ago. Never. Again.

Three years ago, shortly before my EDS diagnosis, I damaged the lateral collateral ligament (LCL), which runs down the outside of the knee. This resulted in me needing to wear a hefty leg brace for around three months. I’ve had issues with my knee since the age of ten, but this injury wrecked my knee pretty badly and I now need to have on-going physio treatment on my knee to keep it working as well as possible. How did I sustain this injury you ask? I was moving my bed side table [not heavy!].

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On the same theme of The Right Knee, I dislocated my knee, standing up, after sitting weirdly on the floor for a long period of time. From memory, I think I was w-sitting, which is a sitting position which many people with EDS find comfortable. It’s also very bad for the joints!

Shortly after I came out of my knee brace, I went to Portugal with a friend. I decided to make the most of being injury free and we went on a high ropes obstacle course. The end result of me living wildly was that I somehow damaged my shoulder badly and needed surgery in the summer of 2015 to repair the rotator cuff and tighten the muscles, ligaments and tendons to stop my muscle from popping out of the joint.

Last summer, prior to being diagnosed with vasovagal syncope and mild POTS, I fainted whilst walking upstairs and hit my face on the bannister. The following day, I was rushed to A&E with a suspected fracture in my cheek bone and potential damage to my eye. Thankfully all was okay! My poor cat was also squashed during this episode and it stopped him from being my little shadow for a few days. Poor puss.

Linked to me being a little bit fainty: during a PE lesson in my GCSE years at school, we were having to do shuttle runs, starting in press-up position. My body couldn’t cope with the change in gravity, resulting in a blood pressure drop and me falling to the ground, via my shoulder and breaking it. I was banned from shuttle runs after this.

I’ve talked a lot over recent months about on-going gastrointestinal issues and how this has resulted in me being sick numerous a day. This has caused various issues, as you can probably imagine, not least numerous dislocations of my jaw and damage to my “sick muscles” as my physio very scientifically called them.

As I said at the beginning of this post, this is by no means all my injuries, I’ve missed out the broken bones and other operations that I’ve had and I’m sure there are other injuries that I have forgotten about. EDS doesn’t just affect my joints, it is a multi systemic condition, affecting all the connective tissues in my body, from my head to my toes. Life with EDS can be hard and it’s often very misunderstood by people, but when it comes to injuries, I have the attitude of “if I don’t laugh, then I’ll cry.” It helps that my way of dealing with pain is pure hysterical laughter, which can be confusing for the medical staff when they treat me.

If you want more information about Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, you can do so here.

 

 

 

 

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