EDS Awareness Month: A Week in the Life

EDS awareness

 

As part of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Awareness month, I thought I was share a snippet of what my life is like, in the form of a week in the life. This week is pretty average in terms of appointments and I’m not having a flare-up of symptoms, which has allowed me to carry in as normally as possible.

 

Monday

Today is mostly being spent recovering, following a weekend staying with my best friend. It wasn’t a wild weekend, of any sort, but unfortunately, I need a few days to recover after doing something. The travelling, in particular, has taken it out of me a bit and as a result, I am in more pain that normal. My right knee is very swollen, due to a mild dislocation from walking too much. My back is also more painful than usual: coach seating and underground seating isn’t ideal when you have back problems!

A while ago, I got myself a “Please Offer Me A Seat” badge, which is issued from Transport for London. This means that I’m able to ask people for a seat on underground trains when it’s really busy. The badge isn’t always well received: on the surface, I look like a healthy young adult, meaning that I have to tell people that I have a hidden disability. Sometimes, I can’t face having this conversation, so I stand. This makes me feel very dizzy and I am unsteady on my feet as it is. Throwing a moving tube train into the mix means that I resemble Bambi on ice. Eye roll.

Overall, today hasn’t been too bad in terms of dislocations. My fingers have been a bit free-spirited, as has my wrist but nothing too alarming.

Dislocation Count: Two

What: Right wrist and fingers

How: Cleaning my cat’s litter tray and making my bed

 

Tuesday

I have been dreading today. This morning I forced myself to go swimming, following advice from my physiotherapist to try and slowly introduce exercise back into my life, to see if it helps with my motility and general mood. Having endorphins zipping around my body has definitely made me feel a little bit more positive about life. Exercise is also allowing me to reconnect with my body and feel in control, at a time when I feel very out of control. My physio has given me some hydro-therapy exercises to do in the pool as well. with the aim of building my my core muscles and strength – my muscle mass as greatly reduced over the past few months, which has had a knock-on effect on how well I control my EDS symptoms.

This afternoon I had an appointment with gastroenterology. When I last saw my gastroenterologist, I took my Vomit Queen status to a whole new level, so I was aiming low in terms of this appointment: as long as I managed not to be sick, it would be a success.

In terms of managing not to be sick, the appointment was a complete success. In less positive news, I was officially diagnosed with gastroparesis this afternoon. I feel a bit emotionally numb about the diagnosis, it’s basically confirmed something which had been suspected since the beginning of the year but my consultant told me, very simply, that I will never have a normally digestive system again and aiming to live without vomiting is something that is incredibly unlikely. That sucks a bit, but I’m trying to focus on the fact that now I have a formal diagnosis, my medical team can start to formulate a clearer plan in how best to treat me.

Dislocation count: One (I think)

What: Rib(s)

How: Being sick

 

Wednesday

I had an appointment with my therapist over lunch today so we took advantage of the timing and did a supported meal. Well, she had a meal, I had a supplement drink, but that still remained a challenge, as I have hit a bit of a wall in terms of managing my intake through liquid nutrition drinks.

We also talked through my appointment from yesterday and how I’m feeling about what was said. I’m still feeling pretty numb about things, although the overarching feeling is relief more than anything. I suspect that in time, once the reality of the situation has hit home, there will be some tears and swearing. In general though, I’m feeling calm about things.

I went swimming again this morning. Whilst exercise is helping me mentally, I think that I might have overdone it slightly: my shoulder is very painful. I’m trying not to move my arm too much as movement makes the pain worse.

Dislocation count: Two

What: Thumb and toe

How: Picking up a box and walking

 

Thursday

Blood test this morning, to check my inflammation markers, as my last blood tests, run by my GP, showed that my C-reactive protein (CRP) was raised. I think a full blood count will also be checked; I normally have a full blood test every three to four months. As usual, there was a slight issue in finding a vein, I’m 99.9% sure my veins know when they’re able to be stabbed and go into hiding. I’m grateful that the nurses at my GP surgery know me well and remember that I’m a bit of a bleeder.

My aim had been to have a rest day today but that ended up not happening.

Dislocation count: One full and one partial

What: Shoulder and jaw

How: Taking a jumper off and yawning

 

Friday

Back again at my GP surgery, this time for an appointment with my GP. We talked through the medical side of my gastroparesis diagnosis – my consultant wants me to try some different medication, so my GP prescribed that today.

I feel really really tired today, partly because it is so warm at the moment. Not working does have a few benefits though and one of them is being able to sit in the garden and enjoy the rarity that is the sun in Great Britain. Lots of people have asked me how I keep myself entertained as I’m not working. The answer is simple: reading! When I don’t have the concentration levels of read an actual physical book, I listen to audiobooks.

Dislocation count: One

What: Shoulder

How: Taking a jumper off

 

Saturday and Sunday

Very hot again over the weekend. Hot weather is a blessing and a curse when it comes to having a chronic illness, my joints much prefer warmer weather to cold weather but POTS, vasovagal syncope and asthma are not huge fans and I need to be careful that I don’t become dehydrated. Having POTS and vasovagal syncope means that my blood vessels are a bit rubbish when it comes to doing what they should be doing. In simple terms, they are too relaxed and slow at contradicting and dilating, so blood pools in my frets and hands, meaning that my brain doesn’t get enough blood, which makes me feel dizzy and unwell.

On the EDS side of things, whilst my joints are less stiff and painful in warmer weather, I end up swelling up and this causes pressure on joints around my body. I have no idea why this happens, or if this is a common EDS thing…but basically whatever the weather and my body isn’t happy. Eye roll.

The hot weather has also played havoc with my sleep, so I’ll probably be spending next week catching up on my missed sleep over this weekend. People with EDS are likely to have adrenaline issues and that makes it really hard for us to fall asleep and stay asleep. And when we do fall asleep, we are prone to having crazy vivid dreams which feel like reality to us, combine that with being on medication which can cause vivid dreams and nighttime can be an odd time for me! I’ve also struggled with painsomnia over the past few nights. This is insomnia but with added extreme pain, meaning that I am in too much pain to sleep. Great fun.

Dislocation count: Three

What: Jaw (x2) and ribs

Doing what: Being sick

 

I hope this has given you an insight into what life is like with EDS. As I said, this has been a fairly average week for me, if you’ve seen out out and about, I won’t have looked sick, but lots of stuff has been happening that isn’t necessarily visible or obvious unless you know me well. Remember: you don’t have to look a certain way to be unwell!

 

 

6 thoughts on “EDS Awareness Month: A Week in the Life

  1. My goodness. Reading your week has truly made me think about silent sicknesses. We often look at people from the outside and judge who they are completely. Also, who cares what people think, you better use that bus pass you were given. People will get over it.

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    • Exactly and looks can be deceiving. I’m yet to get a free bus pass but I do have a badge from Transport for London, which says “Please offer me a seat” and I have received very mixed responses, ranging from being given a seat, to being forced to stand on a long tube journey because I don’t look disabled and people therefore assumed that I was just joking with the badge.

      Like

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